Our hands are probably our most useful tool. They are also potential dirtiest and germ-spreading tool we have

Hi this is Jody Jo. Washing your hands may seem like an easy task but most of us aren’t doing it often enough and aren’t doing it correctly. Regularly and effectively cleaning your hands is a great way to protect yourself from serious infections. Clean hands are something that EVERYONE needs to be mindful of.

Did you know?

  1. Up to 80% of communicable diseases are transferred by touch.
  2. Kitchen cutting boards contain 200% more fecal bacteria than a toilet seat.
  3. TV remote controls are a leading carrier of bacteria.
  4. Germs from flushing a toilet can travel up to 6 feet.
  5. Handbags and purses carry up to 10,000 bacteria per square inch.

As cold and flu season sets in, Kaweah Delta and the Centers for Disease Control want to remind you that Clean Hands Count.

 

 To learn more about staying healthy during flu season go to kaweahdelta.org.

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Topic: Clean Hands Count
 
Our hands are probably our most useful tool. They are also potentially the most dirty and germ-spreading tool we have. We do a lot with our hands – including touching around 300 surfaces every 30 minutes. Up to 80% of communicable diseases are transferred by touch. That’s a lot of potential exposure to germs and other “bugs”. As cold and flu season sets in, Kaweah Delta and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) want to remind you that Clean Hands Count.
 
Washing your hands seems like an easy task but most of us aren’t doing it often enough and aren’t doing it correctly. Regularly and effectively cleaning your hands is a great way to protect yourself from serious infections. Preventing the spread of germs is especially important in healthcare settings. Do not be afraid to ask your health care provider if they have cleaned their hands before treating you. Speak up for yourself or your loved ones. Clean hands are something that EVERYONE needs to me mindful of.
 
You should also clean your own hands:
  • After using the restroom (soap and water)
  • Before eating (soap and water)
  • After touching doorknobs or other high traffic surfaces (hand rails or stair rails, ATM or elevator buttons, doorknobs, light switches, remote controls, cell phones)
  • Before touching your eyes, nose or mouth
  • After blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing
  • Before and after changing any bandages or treating any wounds
 
Alcohol based hand sanitizer is effective at killing germs and is easy to use if hands do not look dirty.
  1. Put the product on your hands and rub them together, covering all surfaces until hands feel dry.
  2. Common missed areas include fingertips, between the fingers and thumbs so be sure you are covering all your hands and fingers.
  3. This should take around 20 seconds if done correctly.
 
If hands look dirty, or you’re about to eat or have used the restrooms, clean hands with soap and water.
 
Facts:
  • Only 5% of people are washing their hands for 15 seconds or more (the recommended time).
  • 1 in 5 people don’t wash their hands at all and only 30% use soap.
  • Kitchen cutting boards contain 200% more fecal bacteria than a toilet seat.
  • TV remote controls are a leading carrier of bacteria.
  • Germs from flushing a toilet can travel up to 6 feet.
  • Handbags and purses carry up to 10,000 bacteria per square inch.

HELPFUL RESOURCES

Here are some helpful resources for more information:
kaweahdelta.org